The Catholic University of America

ASL  |  Arabic  |  Chinese  |  French  |  German  |  Irish  |  Italian |  Portuguese  |  Spanish

Spanish @ CUA

Undergraduate Programs

Graduate Programs

Faculty

Courses

Internships

Study Abroad

Spanish Courses for Heritage Speakers

Student Organizations

 

 

For Advising : 
 
Spanish and SIS majors/minors

Dr. McMahon (mcmahonc@cua.edu)

Spanish heritage learners:
Dr. Mayka Puente (puente@cua.edu)

Spanish for Health Services
Jennifer Maxwell (maxwellj@cua.edu)
 
Study Abroad for Majors and Minors
Dr. McMahon (mcmahonc@cua.edu)
 
  

 

 

News and Events

Undergraduate Study Abroad Award by Sigma Delta Pi

Johanna Cajina Castillo

has been awarded the 2013 Undergraduate Study Abroad Award by Sigma Delta Pi (the National Collegiate Hispanic Honor Society). Johanna, a Politics and Spanish major with a minor in Latin American and Latino Studies, will study abroad at the University of Havana in Cuba this summer

One of our recent graduates shares her experience working at the U.S-Mexico border

 Teresa Vyhanek 

This summer I had the privilege to intern as a contact volunteer at Annunciation House, an emergency shelter for migrants and refugees, in El Paso, Texas. As a contact volunteer, I was responsible for the guests’ welfare and transition into U.S. society. Having graduated in May 2013, I can truly say my degree in Spanish for International Services was put to full use at Annunciation House. Not only was the house primarily run in Spanish (as most of the guests were from Mexico and Central America), but the following are a few examples of how my studies prepared me for cultural factors that hid below the language. The fact that I walked into the House with an understanding of how and why Central Americans and Mexicans come to the U.S.-Mexico border enabled me to connect more personally with the guests. My course in translation allowed me to accurately convey important information guests were receiving in the mail. Having studied social movements and civil wars in Central America allowed me to understand Annunciation House’s role and importance during its 35-year history of serving more than 125,000 migrants. I could understand references to liberation theology and know iconic figures like Oscar Romero, which the shelter takes as a patron. I attribute my deep appreciation for different cultures and the personal connections that creates with migrants to my education which opened my mind. I have grown abundantly from the work I was doing at Annunciation House, and it was my courses at Catholic that first ignited my interest in the immigrant and made my time in El Paso so powerful.