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Course Descriptions

Spanish (SPAN)

To view the complete schedule of courses for
each semester, go to Cardinal Station.

SPAN 101: Elementary Spanish I

4.00 Credits

Designed for students with little or no experience with Spanish. Introduction to the basic principles of language necessary for written and oral communication. Students use fundamental vocabulary and grammar structures to talk about daily life and learn about Hispanic countries and their cultures. Students who took the language in high school for more than one year MUST take the language placement test before registering for this or any other language course in order to receive proper credit. Not open to native and heritage speakers of Spanish. Undergraduate Language courses 101-113 are subject to an Instructional Fee at the time of registration. For current Tuition and Fees visit http://enrollmentservices.cua.edu/Student-Financial-Information/Costs.cfm.

SPAN 102: Elementary Spanish II

4.00 Credits

Continuation of Spanish 101. Students talk and write about the present, past and future and continue to explore Hispanic countries and their cultures through readings and Internet activities. Prerequisite: C- or better in Spanish 101, appropriate placement score or equivalent. Not open to native and heritage speakers of Spanish. During the summer class meets five days per week. Undergraduate Language courses 101-113 are subject to an Instructional Fee at the time of registration. For current Tuition and Fees visit http://enrollmentservices.cua.edu/Student-Financial-Information/Costs.cfm.

SPAN 103: Intermediate Spanish I

3.00 Credits

Students improve their communication skills by discussing and writing about various topics drawn from readings and short films focused on Hispanic culture. Includes some review and expansion of grammar and vocabulary. Prerequisite: C- or better in Spanish 102 or 112, or equivalent. During the summer class meets five days per week. Undergraduate Language courses 101-113 are subject to an Instructional Fee at the time of registration. For current Tuition and Fees visit http://enrollmentservices.cua.edu/Student-Financial-Information/Costs.cfm.

SPAN 104: Intermediate Spanish II

3.00 Credits

Continuation of Span 103. Students further develop their communication abilities by discussing and writing about various topics drawn from readings and short films. Includes vocabulary expansion and integration and refinement of grammar. C- or better in 103 or equivalent. During the summer class meets five days per week. Not open to native and heritage speakers of Spanish. Undergraduate Language courses 101-113 are subject to an Instructional Fee at the time of registration. For current Tuition and Fees visit http://enrollmentservices.cua.edu/Student-Financial-Information/Costs.cfm.

SPAN 107: Spanish for Health Care I

3.00 Credits

This is the first course of a two semester sequence of Spanish for Health Care. Students are introduced to the basic principles of Spanish necessary for working in the field of medicine and health care. Emphasis on developing conversational and written skills needed to deal with medical situations through lectures, cultural immersion activities, role playing, dialogues related to the clinical setting and a community based service learning project. Designed for medical or nursing students; previous experience with Spanish recommended but not required. Native or advanced speakers should enroll in SPAN 207.

SPAN 107T: Spanish for Health Care I

3.00 Credits

This course bills at a special rate. Contact the Department of Modern Languages for information.

SPAN 108P: International Clinical Practicum

0 Credits

no description available

SPAN 108T: Spanish for Health Care II

3.00 Credits

This course bills at a special rate. Contact the Department of Modern Languages for information.

SPAN 111: Intermediate Spanish for Heritage Speakers

3.00 Credits

Designed for heritage students with some exposure to Spanish in informal contexts. Students use fundamental vocabulary and grammar structures to talk about daily life and learn about Hispanic cultures in the US and abroad. Span 111 has a special focus on oral proficiency development through conversation and oral presentations. This course allows students to complete the language requirement in one semester. Prerequisite: Heritage Placement Test. Enrollment requirement: Heritage Placement Test

SPAN 112: Review of Elementary Spanish

4.00 Credits

Designed for students who have had two or more years of high school Spanish and for those whose study of Spanish has been interrupted for a period of time. Intensive review course that combines the objectives of Spanish 101 and 102 in one semester. Prerequisite: Appropriate score on the SAT II or the CUA placement test. Not open to native and heritage speakers of Spanish. Undergraduate Language courses 101-113 are subject to an Instructional Fee at the time of registration. For current Tuition and Fees visit http://enrollmentservices.cua.edu/Student-Financial-Information/Costs.cfm.

SPAN 113: Intensive Intermediate Spanish

6.00 Credits

Designed especially for students who wish to complete the language requirement in one semester in order to move more quickly into upper level Spanish classes or study abroad. Intensive course combining the objectives of 103 and 104. Class meets five days a week. Prerequisite: B- or better in Spanish 112 or 102. Spanish 113 may not be taken to replace a D/F in Spanish 103. Not open to native and heritage speakers of Spanish. Undergraduate Language courses 101-113 are subject to an Instructional Fee at the time of registration. For current Tuition and Fees visit http://enrollmentservices.cua.edu/Student-Financial-Information/Costs.cfm.

SPAN 120: Discovering Madrid Through the Arts

1.00 Credits

1-credit trip to the city of Madrid, where students will have the opportunity to see first-hand Madrid's most important monuments and landmarks, as well as contemplate canonical works of art by Velazquez or Goya. Students will visit impressive royal palaces (Madrid, Escorial), follow the literary steps of Cervantes and Perez Galdos, and experience Madrid's famous lively urban culture.

SPAN 150: Intensive Spanish Immersion Abroad

6.00 Credits

no description available

SPAN 198: Practical Spanish for Clinical Health Care Professionals

1.00 Credits

no description available

SPAN 203: Advanced Spanish Conversation & Composition I

3.00 Credits

This class emphasizes the development of conversation skills, vocabulary expansion, pronunciation & a review of basic grammatical structures, using audiovisual presentations as well as newspaper and magazine articles as a basis for discussion. Required for majors & minors. Prerequisite: SPAN 104 or equivalent. Fulfills the humanities requirement. Not open to native and heritage speakers of Spanish.

SPAN 204: Advanced Spanish Conversation & Composition II

3.00 Credits

This course emphasizes written expression & the refinement of grammatical competence necessary for students to speak & write on contemporary topics of interest to the Spanish-speaking world. Required for majors & minors; open to other students. Prerequisite: 203 or equivalent or permission of instructor required. Fulfills the humanities requirement. Not open to native and heritage speakers of Spanish.

SPAN 205: Cultural Perspectives of Spain

3.00 Credits

The first part of this course will focus upon contemporary Spanish language, politics, and culture, followed by an analysis of the rich history and cultural diversity of Spain. The second part of the course will present outstanding achievements in literature and the arts over the centuries. Topics of discussion will range from prehistoric art through the religious fervor of the Reconquista, the Golden Age splendor of the Renaissance, and the decadence of Spain at the end of the Hapsburg Dynasty, ending with a discussion of the causes and repercussions of the Spanish Civil War, the rise of democracy and Spain's inclusion in the European Union. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: 104

SPAN 206: Topics in Latin American Culture

3.00 Credits

Examines diverse topics and debates within Latin American culture from sociohistorical, political, artistic and literary perspectives. Topics will vary and may include issues such as gender roles and the family, the urban experience, revolutionary and indigenous movements, and globalization and hybrid identities. Open to minors. Majors may take either 205 or 206 (both may count with consent of adviser). Prerequisite: SP 203-204 or SP 210-211 or consent of instructor.

SPAN 207: Advanced Spanish for Health Care I

3.00 Credits

This is the first course of a two semester sequence of Advanced Spanish for Health Care which emphasizes more oral communication, medical terminology, and cross-cultural awareness. It provides essential points of grammar and vocabulary for students whose profession requires a working knowledge of Spanish. It uses a great variety of reading materials as a starting point for conversation related to the clinical setting and oral presentations in class. Includes a service-learning component. Designed for medical or nursing students; previous experience with Spanish required. Prerequisite: SPAN 108 or consent of instructor.

SPAN 208: Advanced Spanish for Health Care II

3.00 Credits

This course is a continuation of Advanced Spanish for Health Care I with continued practice of conducting medical assessments in Spanish, such as the registration interview, health history and risks, and physical assessment. The course includes structural review and realistic, practical dialogues dealing with the different situations that medical personnel encounter in the course of their work. Designed for medical or nursing students; previous experience with Spanish required. Includes a service-learning component. Prerequisite: SPAN 207 or consent of instructor.

SPAN 210: Spanish for Heritage Speakers I

3.00 Credits

Designed for heritage students with some exposure to Spanish in formal and/or informal contexts. Students use the target language to communicate ideas on topics related to the community and of general interest. Span 210 has a special focus on oral and written proficiency development through vocabulary building, grammar review, spelling and punctuation practice, and writing strategies. Required for heritage speakers who major or minor in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 111 or Heritage Placement Test. Fulfills the humanities requirement.

SPAN 211: Spanish for Heritage Speakers II

3.00 Credits

Designed for students who have been exposed to Spanish in formal and informal contexts. Students use the target language to communicate and debate ideas on topics of factual and more abstract nature. This course emphasizes written expression (creative and academic), reading (narrative, drama, essay), and conversation. It expands on refining grammatical competence and vocabulary building necessary for students to effectively read and write on topics of interest to the Spanish-speaking world. Required for heritage speakers who major or minor in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 210 or Heritage Placement Test. Fulfills the humanities requirement.

SPAN 213: Performing US Latino/a Identity

3.00 Credits

Interdisciplinary study of the performance of US Latino/a identity through the study of literature, music, visual arts. and media arts in the 20th and 21st centuries. We will examine literary texts, music, musicals, films, visual arts, and TV shows and other media arts by major US Latino/a and non-US Latino/a figures such as Hector Tobar, Gloria Anzaldúa, Esmeralda Santiago, Oscar Hijuelos, Sandra Cisneros, Amparo Escandón, Celia Cruz, Selena, Rubén Blades, Ritchie Valens, Gregory Nava, Luiz Valdés, Lin-Manuel Miranda, George Lopez, José Antonio Burciaga, Yreina Cervantez,among others. This course fulfills literature and humanities distribution requirements; it will be conducted in English.

SPAN 214: The Inca Empire before and after the conquest

3.00 Credits

no description available

SPAN 215: Spain Through Art, Music and Literature

3.00 Credits

This innovative and interdisciplinary course takes the student to a cultural and literary journey through Spain by examining the historic, geographic and generational diversity of various Spanish artistic forms from the Middle Ages to modern times. Lectures and class discussion will complement a wide spectrum of audio-visual material that will show the major characteristics of early Iberian iconography, the Renaissance works of Luis de Morales, the mannerism style of El Greco, the baroque portrait artistry of Diego Velázquez, the revolutionary and visionary Rococo expressions of Francisco Goya, the Impressionism and Post-Impressionism of Sorolla, and the major works of the 20th century by Picasso and Dalí. The course will furthermore offer a discussion of the origins of Spanish music and present various samples of the vibrant and long history of music in Spain from the Gregorian chant and the xarchas to flamenco and regional folk music to contemporary pop music. Completing the course will be a reading and textual analysis of key parts of major literary texts, among them the Cid, La Celestina, Lazarillo de Tormes, and the more modern works by Galdós, Valera, Unamuno, Ortega y Gasset, and Camilo José Cela. Fulfills humanities and literature requirement

SPAN 225: Magic in German and Hispanic Literature and Film

3.00 Credits

This course explores 'Magical Realism', the merging of reality with magical elements, as it evolved in the art and literature in German and Spanish speaking countries. Through a variety of texts, students will develop an understanding of the concept and its different representations. Critical questions of translation, regionalism, and cultural identity will be discussed. Readings include works by such acclaimed authors as Gabriel García Márquez, Günter Grass, Mario Vargas Llosa, Ernst Jünger, Jorge Luis Borges, Alejo Carpentier, Marie Luise Kaschnitz, Laura Esquivel, and Patrick Süskind Films include Un chien andalou (Luis Buñuel; Salvador Dalí, 1929), Aguirre. Der Zorn Gottes (Werner Herzog, 1972), Como agua para chocolate (Alfonso Arau, 1992). In English. Fulfills the humanities and literature requirement.

SPAN 240: From Court to Modernity: Madrid Through the Arts

3.00 Credits

This course is intended to provide an introduction to the rich cultural and artistic history of Spain's capital city, Madrid. Home to the Habsburg and the Bourbon monarchies, this city served as inspiration for the unique style of Velazquez, Cervantes, and Goya. The majestic Monastery of El Escorial, the Plaza Mayor, the Paseo del Prado, or some of the most impressive Royal Palaces in Europe (Madrid, Aranjuez, La Granja) bring back memories of a vast empire that extended from the Mediterranean to the Philippines. A city in decline at the turn of the 19th to the 20th century, the Gran Via haunted the imagination of decadent artists with its bohemian tertulias and literary cafes, while also welcoming some of the most important avant-garde artists in Europe 'Lorca, Dalí, Buñuel, to name just a few' at the Residencia de Estudiantes. 'The most Spanish of all cities', as Hemingway would call it, Madrid has forged a culture of 'Spanishness' that today's most acclaimed Spanish filmmaker, Pedro Almodovar, has reconstructed to put Spain's capital back on the world map of contemporary culture. The course is taught in English.

SPAN 267: Spanish as a Minority Language

3.00 Credits

The main goal of this course is to provide students with a principled way of understanding the issues surrounding the status of Spanish as a minority language in the US and how this affects its communities and individuals. The course includes an introduction to general theories of and approaches to language contact, minority languages and group identity, but it focuses on the particular situation of the Spanish language in the US. It covers issues of language policies, language maintenance/loss, heritage language acquisition, and the notion of 'standard' vs. 'sub-standard' language. This course is especially recommended for students who wish to enrich their knowledge and comprehension of the Spanish speaking communities in the US and wish to comprehend in more depth the issues involved in situation of languages in contact. No previous knowledge of linguistics is necessary. Students will complete an individual research project. English is the language of instruction but knowledge of Spanish is recommended.

SPAN 270: Latin American Cinema: A History

3.00 Credits

This course, taught in English, offers an in depth introduction to the history of Latin American cinema and film culture. With a comparative approach, it studies cinema's capacity to motivate political reflection, build modern identities, and shape public discourse in a region rife with social inequality. Travelling across regions and époques/times, the course covers six cinematic periods: contemporary cinema, the New Latin American Cinema, Art Cinema, Neorealism, Studio Cinema, and Silent Cinema. Students will pay attention to the historical and sociopolitical contexts films spring from and reflect upon, while developing the critical tools and learn basic theoretical tenets for the study of moving images. Fulfills CUA humanities and literature requirements.

SPAN 271: Spanish & Latin American Literature in Translation

3.00 Credits

This course introduces some of the more representative modern/contemporary writers from the Iberian Peninsula and Latin America to an English-speaking audience. Authors may include a selection of the following: Isabel Allende, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Lygia Fagundes Telles, Ignacio de Loyola Brandao, Javier Marias, and Jose Saramago, among others. Throughout the semester we will cover a variety of topics and genres from an interdisciplinary perspective as we explore the connections between literary and artistic production and important issues in contemporary society. Topics will vary (consult adviser for details). Taught in English.

SPAN 274: Costa Rica's Civilization and Culture

3.00 Credits

Interdisciplinary study of Costa Rica's civilization and culture (literature, art, music, film, folklore, history, etc.). Will be taught in English. Spanish majors will receive credit if completing readings, written assignments and additional discussion sessions in Spanish. Fulfills Humanities and Literature requirements.

SPAN 277: Cultural Competence Awareness in Health Care

3.00 Credits

This course is an on-line asynchronous course combined along with scheduled discussions with the professor and threaded discussions with peers. The objective of this on-line course is to develop cultural awareness and sensitivity skills along with Medical Spanish language acquisition that will help students provide competent and excellent healthcare to Hispanic populations. This course is taught in English and there will be nuances of Spanish to better explain the cultural material.

SPAN 277T: Cultural Competence Awareness in Health Care

3.00 Credits

This course bills at a special rate. Contact the Department of Modern Languages for information.

SPAN 300: Thinking Critically: Literature, Film, and Media in the Spanish-Speaking World

3.00 Credits

This course is designed to introduce the students to the fundamental concepts and terms for the study of literature, film, and other cultural media in Spanish. A substantial part of the course work will be devoted to the careful reading, analysis, and discussion of works of fiction and non-fiction narratives, drama, poetry, and film, while also developing the oral and written communication of the students in the target language. The course content includes Spanish and Latin American literature, film, and testimony, as well as secondary readings in Spanish. Fulfills CUA humanities and literature requirements.

SPAN 301: Society and Culture in the Spanish-Speaking World

3.00 Credits

This course provides students with the necessary historical background and social and cultural context to analyze contemporary issues in the Spanish-speaking world. Students will study the appropriate historical and contextual framework in order to critically analyze contemporary issues. By completing a series of modules students will become familiar with both the key historical events and the contemporary debates in the Spanish-speaking world. Required for majors and recommended for any students who will enroll in 300-level and higher courses. Fulfills humanities requirement. Prerequisite: 203, 204, or 211.

SPAN 302: Mapping the Hispanic Worlds: Contemporary Issues, Trends and Debates in the US and Abroad

3.00 Credits

This course, required for Spanish for International Service majors, explores contemporary issues pertaining to the Hispanic community worldwide. Students in this course will examine the role that the contemporary Spanish-speaking world plays in globalization, multiculturalism, and immigration by paying particular attention at the institutional level. Students will become acquainted with various governmental and nongovernmental organizations that serve the Hispanic community in the DC metropolitan area, dealing with issues such as political advocacy, economic development, women's rights, healthcare, helping vulnerable populations and empowering youth. The course also includes a local community engagement component. Prerequisite: Spn 300 or 301

SPAN 304: Public Speaking: Strategies for Oral Communication in Spanish

3.00 Credits

Development of techniques for formal public speaking in Spanish. Research, composition and delivery of oral presentations for varied audiences and purposes. Includes strategies for organizing and presenting information, the use of rhetorical patterns for informative and persuasive goals, techniques to reduce speech anxiety and the effective use of voice and body for clear and successful presentations in Spanish. Prerequisites: SP 204 or consent of instructor. Fulfills Humanities requirement.

SPAN 305: Public Speaking for Heritage Students

3.00 Credits

Designed for heritage students who have been exposed to Spanish in formal and informal contexts. This course focuses on the development and practice of techniques for formal public speaking in Spanish. It includes strategies for organizing and presenting information, rhetorical devices and vocabulary expansion, techniques to reduce speech anxiety, and effective body language for a successful oral presentation in Spanish. It fulfills the humanities requirement. Prerequisite: 210 or Heritage Placement Test. Enrollment requirement: Span 210, Heritage Placement Test or Consent of Instructor.

SPAN 306: Spanish Phonetics

3.00 Credits

An overview of the essential principles of Spanish pronunciation and intonation including the International Phonetic Alphabet. Students raise their awareness of the sound system of Spanish and improve their pronunciation, making it more authentic and eliminating serious errors typically made by non-native speakers. Students develop and out-of-class community-oriented project to complement the classwork. Required for SIS & Secondary Education majors. Prerequisite: 204

SPAN 307: Communication and Culture in Spanish-English Health Care Settings

3.00 Credits

This course is the first part of a two-course sequence designed for heritage speakers and advanced level students of Spanish who have a background in the health sciences. It presents a foundational and practical approach to working in bilingual settings (hospitals, clinics and health care organizations.) It will acquaint students with standard Spanish terminology and dialects and their equivalents in English, which are likely to occur in health care settings. It examines patient-provider communication through written and oral materials. The practical, legal and ethical dimensions involved in bilingual and multi-lingual health care communication will also be covered.

SPAN 308: Applied Spanish in Health Care Education From Childhood To Advanced Years

3.00 Credits

This course is the second part of a two-course sequence designed for heritage speakers and advanced level students of Spanish who have a background in the health sciences. It consists of written communication techniques and role play activities geared toward education and patient care from childhood to advanced years. Includes a four-hour service-learning component in which students use knowledge acquired in class. Prerequisite: Instructor consent.

SPAN 309: Taking Laughter Seriously: Humor in Latin American Cultures and LIteratures

3.00 Credits

How do Latin American artists use humor in their artwork? How does humor affect readers' perceptions of reality? How does humor become at once an aesthetic experience and a tool of resistance and political criticism? This interdisciplinary course will explore expressions of humor in Latin America with special focus on the Southern Cone's cultures and literatures. By analyzing the use of laughter as a pliable tool of subversion and conservatism, we will study different functions and scopes that have shaped humor in culture and literature during the 20th century. This course strives to enhance students' understanding of the Southern cone cultures through analysis of short stories, essays, poetry, comic strips, and films. Readings will include texts by Pablo Neruda, Macedonio Fernandez, Felisberto Hernandez, Alejandra Piszarnik, Julio Cortazar, Juan Carlos Onetti, and Cesar Aira. A Final research paper is required. Fulfills Humanities and literature requirements.

SPAN 310: Contemporary Hispanic Issues

3.00 Credits

This course is intended to improve language proficiency (writing, conversation, and reading) through the intensive study of current issues pertaining to Hispanic cultures. This is an interdisciplinary course that covers a wide variety of texts (literature, journalism, visual arts, film, music). It includes a community engagement component. Topics will vary. Prerequisite: SPAN 204 or 211.

SPAN 312: US Latino/a Literature, Film, and Music

3.00 Credits

Interdisciplinary study of US Latino/a cultural production through the study of literature, film, and music in the 20th and 21st centuries. We will closely examine readings, films, and songs in Spanish, English, and Spanglish, by major US Latino/a figures such as Hector Tobar, Gloria Anzaldúa, Esmeralda Santiago, Oscar Hijuelos, Alejandro Morales, Sandra Cisneros, Amparo Escandón, Celia Cruz, Selena, Rubén Blades, Ritchie Valens, Gregory Nava, Luiz Valdés, among others. This course fulfills SPAN310 major requirement; counts towards majors and minor in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 204 or 211.

SPAN 314: Introduction to Spanish for the Professions

3.00 Credits

This course, designed for the intermediate to advanced level Spanish students, emphasizes the application of Spanish in a variety of professional settings: business, law, tourism, technology, medicine, service and internships. It includes task-based activities and projects in which the students will use Spanish for specific real-world purposes. In addition, students will gain an understanding of Hispanic cultures in professional settings.

SPAN 316: Advanced Writing and Grammar for Heritage Speakers

3.00 Credits

This course is designed for Spanish Heritage students who would like to pursue a minor or major in Spanish or who would like to further improve their writing and reading skills in Spanish. Through the readings of a variety of texts and weekly writing exercises, this course seeks to strengthen the student's confidence in the language and to expand vocabulary and grammar structures used in formal and professional settings.

SPAN 317: Enigmatic Microfictions (Microcuentos) in Spain and Latin America

3.00 Credits

This course examines the origin and evolution of the modern literary genre of microfiction (el microcuento) in its socio-historical contexts. This genre, often described as literature-at-a-glance, is characterized by brevity and relies on a precise language, humor, parody, irony, and satire. The stories are often philosophical and poetic. The course explores the multifaceted and hybrid characteristics of Spanish and Latin American microcuentos' production by also offering a theoretical and critical framework. Categories of analysis will concern the genre and its possible definitions and problematic applications. Fulfills CUA humanities and literature requirements.

SPAN 321: Portraits of Spain: Literature and Culture in the Medieval and Early Modern Eras

3.00 Credits

Survey of the major authors and a close reading of representative selections from 1100 to 1700, with attention to the development of literary genres in the context of the changing culture of Spain and colonial Latin America; Middle Ages and Renaissance; Cervantes and Baroque. Conducted entirely in Spanish with class discussions and extensive practice in writing commentaries on texts. Prerequisites: 300 or 310 or permission of instructor.

SPAN 324: Mysticism in Literature and Film

3.00 Credits

This course provides a socio-cultural-historical and religious background to the mystical literature of Golden Age Spain as well as a close reading and critical interpretation of selected writings of St Teresa of Avila and John of the Cross with parallel viewing of documentary and cinematographic representations of ascetic and mystical life.

SPAN 325: The Habsburg Dynasty in Spain: Politics and Past-Times

3.00 Credits

This cultural-studies course will focus upon the intersection between politics, culture and religion during the Habsburg Dynasty in Spain (1506-1700). It will provide students with an interdisciplinary approach to this complex period in Spanish history through the presentation and analysis of political intrigues, courtly practices and past-times. Students will learn that the royal court and religious festivals were spaces of political and social exchange, negotiation and multiculturalism.

SPAN 327: Going Rogue: Spanish Picaresque

3.00 Credits

This course will focus upon a close reading of representative selections of the autobiographical picaresque novel and short story in sixteenth century Spain. The pícaro's realistic exploits, observations and social satire reveal the tenuous intersection between politics and culture and the growing chasm between the social classes in baroque Spain. The course will explore how the picaresque novel is revisited in contemporary 'literatura sicaresca,' a relatively new genre of crime fiction that has developed over the past two decades which deals with urban transformations, violence and drug-trafficking. Conducted entirely in Spanish with class discussions, and weekly practice writing commentaries on texts. Prerequisites: SPAN 300 or 301 or by permission of the professor.

SPAN 333: Understanding How The Spanish Language Works

3.00 Credits

This course aims at deepening knowledge of the Spanish language by introducing students to different aspects of linguistic analysis: history of Spanish, the sound system (phonetics and phonology), word formation (morphology), and the interaction between language and society (sociolinguistics). The goal is to provide students with both broad and specific knowledge about Spanish that can help them address areas that are particularly challenging in the mastery of Spanish, such as pronunciation, sentence structure and verb/noun morphology. Future Spanish professionals are encouraged to take this course since they will benefit from a deeper understanding of the structure of the language. No previous knowledge of linguistics is expected.

SPAN 345: Spanish in the United States: Debunking the Myths

3.00 Credits

This course aims to validate the Spanish spoken in the United States by providing students with an introduction to the sociolinguistic, linguistic, and cultural factors that influence these varieties of Spanish and Spanglish. Students will use primary texts to analyze linguistic and sociolinguistic features, discuss Latino culture, and summarize linguistic variation in the United States. Students will also investigate the use of Spanish in the public and educational spheres and examine the effects of language on identity. Course taught in Spanish; fulfills the humanities requirement. . Prerequisites: SPN 204 or 211

SPAN 349: Food, Culture and Society in Latin America

3.00 Credits

This course explores the complex relationships among food, culture and society in Latin America. Topics include indigenous agriculture, how European colonization changed food habits, food production policies and politics in contemporary Latin America, food and constructions of identity, and current culinary trends in an era of globalization. Some fieldwork in the local community is required.

SPAN 356: Latin/o American Popular Song: Socio-Political Movements

3.00 Credits

An interdisciplinary study of modern and contemporary Latin American popular song repertoires and their relationship to socio-political movements. It examines songs from the New Song, Mexican corridos, salsa, norteña music, reggaeton, tango, rock, among others. Prerequisite: Span 204 or 211.

SPAN 376: 20th Century Latin American Poetry

3.00 Credits

Latin America has one of the most renowned and vibrant poetic traditions in the world, boasting two Nobel Laureates, Gabriela Mistral and Pablo Neruda, both of whom are from Chile. In this course we will study its aesthetic developments beginning with modernismo, the first Latin American poetic movement to influence European writers, and the vanguardia, at the same time we examine the changing role of the poet from romantic figure to socially engaged political actor. Poets covered in the course include: Rubén Darío, Gabriela Mistral, César Vallejo, Jorge Luis Borges, Nicolás Guillén, Pablo Neruda and Octavio Paz, among others.

SPAN 380: Film, Culture and History

3.00 Credits

In this class, the student will examine the influence of history and culture on popular expression, particularly on film. Seminal events in the Spanish-speaking world across a variety of time periods will be explored, including the Cuban Revolution, la Guerra Sucia of Argentina, and the Spanish Civil War. Above all, the student will come to see the indelible imprint historical phenomena leaves on cultural expression. Fulfills Humanities requirement.

SPAN 401: Spanish for Business

3.00 Credits

Business Spanish I is designed to further students' working knowledge of grammar, vocabulary and communication while introducing essential business terminology and language situations in finance, economic and marketing contexts. The course will also develop students' geographic literacy and cultural understanding for the purposes of conducting business and working effectively in or with the Spanish-speaking world. Prerequisite: SPAN 203 concurrent or equivalent or consent of instructor.

SPAN 402: Translation in International Affairs

3.00 Credits

Provides an overview of traditional and innovative strategies for written and sight translation of different kinds of texts and basic concepts of translation theory. Interpretation and analysis focus on texts dealing with contemporary economic, political, social, environmental, and cultural considerations. Prerequisites: 204 or 211.

SPAN 412: Encounters: Exploration and Conquest of Latin America

3.00 Credits

The arrival of Christopher Columbus in 1492 to the Americas marked the beginning of the age of exploration and conquest of the continent. We will examine the cultural encounters between the ancient Latin American civilizations and the Europeans. Rather than a historical survey, this course will focus on the cultural artifacts'poetry, songs, pictorial representations, and chronicles'that both Spaniards and indigenous people of the Americas produced to record these events. Conflicting views and diverse artistic expressions blend to represent the cultural tension inherent in what we will call the aesthetics of the encounter.

SPAN 415: Latin American Short Fiction

3.00 Credits

This course examines a wide selection of narrative texts written in the Iberian Peninsula and Latin America in their literary, artistic, and historical contexts. While our primary focus is devoted to the analysis of 20th century short fiction by Latin American canonical writers, including Jorge Luis Borges, Elena Poniatowska, Julio Cortázar, and Luisa Valenzuela, in order to fully understand the rich and complex origins of said production, our inquiry begins with a close examination of 16th century chronicles of the New World- a curious collection of historiography, essays, letter writing, epic poetry and travel books that problematize the relationship between history and literature. Together, we use these texts to shed further light on what Roland Barthes in his essay 'Introduction to Structural Analysis of Narrative,' has described as the 'international, transhistorical and transcultural' manifestations of narrative.

SPAN 425: Memory of the Spanish Civil War

3.00 Credits

The Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) is considered to be a foundational myth without which it is impossible to understand today's Spain. Given the centrality of the conflict's meaning in the country's past and present, this course explores the artistic representations (novels, short stories, poetry, drama, movies, visual arts) that emerged during and after the war in an attempt to better understand the political, social, and cultural complexities of contemporary Spain. Through a variety of literary and historiographical readings, movies, and visual materials, this course analyzes the implications of a series of concepts ' history, memory, commemoration, nostalgia' that have become indispensable in recent debates about war, reconstruction, and reconciliation. Taught in Spanish.

SPAN 448: Cervantes & Spanish Golden Age

3.00 Credits

Following a review of classical, scriptural, and patristic literature, examines the genesis and development of the literary genres in Spain from the Middle Ages to the twentieth century. Poetry, drama, and prose are studied by analyzing fragments of representative literary works. The genres are further examined in relation to the literary production of Cervantes in an effort to show what is traditional and innovative in the great writer and to point out the extent of his influence on subsequent writers in Europe and Latin America. Prerequisites: 300 or 310 or permission of instructor.

SPAN 460: Spanish Variation in the World

3.00 Credits

The goal of this course is to provide students with a principled way of understanding why and how Spanish is spoken differently by different groups of speakers around the world, as well as raise awareness about differences among Spanish dialects. Differences are reviewed by examining mainly how vocabulary and pronunciation differ in several dialects. The course provides specific training that will allow students to identify linguistic cues that will help them recognize (and to some extend, use) different Spanish dialects. This course is taught in Spanish. Fulfills the humanities requirement. Prerequisite: Span 300 or permission of the instructor.

SPAN 485: Legal Translation and Interpretation

3.00 Credits

In this course students will focus on linguistic, ethical, cultural and procedural aspects of translation and interpretation in legal settings. Students will translate legal documents, information, client brochures, forms and other documents both from Spanish to English and vice versa. Students will also serve as interpreters between attorneys and clients, both in clinic and court settings. This course is taught through a partnership between the Department of Modern Languages and the Columbus Community Legal Clinic. Students must have strong written and oral proficiency in both English and Spanish. Prerequisite Span 402 (previously 320) or instructor's permission.

SPAN 486: Special Projects in Advanced Translation

3.00 Credits

Students conduct linguistic and cultural research to develop and implement a translation project for public use. Projects will vary. Prerequisite: Span 402 (previously 320), 485 or permission of instructor

SPAN 488: Senior Special Topics Seminar

3.00 Credits

Required for senior concentrators in Hispanic studies and Spanish for International Service. This course will provide in-depth study of a topic related to Hispanic literatures and cultures. Students will develop strong research skills, such as identifying a problem, defining a thesis, establishing a coherent methodological approach, selecting relevant primary and secondary sources, mastering MLA style, and preparing a paper outline. Specific course content varies. Open only to senior concentrators.

SPAN 489: Research Seminar

3.00 Credits

Students will write a senior thesis in Spanish, at least 20 pages in length, excluding title page and bibliography. This seminar will continue to strengthen students' research skills learned in SPAN 488, and further develop argumentation strategies, use of textual support, application of critical and theoretical literature, editing techniques, and oral presentation style. Students will make formal public oral presentation of their research project in Spanish at the end of the semester. The evaluation will be based on classwork, weekly assignments, the final version of the senior thesis, and the formal oral presentation. Required for Hispanic studies and Spanish for International Service. Open to senior concentrators only.

SPAN 494: Independent Study

3.00 Credits

no description available

SPAN 495A: Spanish Internship

3.00 Credits

SPAN 495 is a for-credit internship open to Spanish studies majors. The course is designed to allow students to apply their knowledge of the Spanish language and their cultural knowledge in the workplace while further developing their competence. Spanish for Business is strongly recommended. Students must get approval from the Spanish academic advisor in the semester prior to taking the course in order to begin plans for the internship. A minimum of 100 hours in the internship are required plus weekly meetings with the internship coordinator.

SPAN 495B: Health Care Internship

3.00 Credits

Spanish for Health Care Internship offers students an opportunity for direct professional experience in a public or private health care setting. It is a for-credit course with a minimum of 100 hours of supervised service during the academic semester or summer. The course consists of on-site internship, meetings with faculty advisor; various assignments including reports, journals, a dossier, a final presentation, and a reaction paper. Subject to approval by the Spanish for Health Care program director.

SPAN 498: Undergraduate Comprehensive Examination

0 Credits

no description available

SPAN 500: Reading for Comprehension

0 Credits

The fundamentals of the language and rapid reading experience. Passing this course fulfills the graduate language requirement. Additional preparation may be needed for advanced requirements in some schools or programs. Cost equivalent to that of a three-credit course.

SPAN 501: Spanish Language and Culture for Health Professional

3.00 Credits

Designed for students in health-related professions who have minimal knowledge of the Spanish language and Hispanic/Latino cultures. Students develop basic language skills to communicate in Spanish with children and families in health care settings and gain insights into cultural issues relating to family, health beliefs, and health care practices. Includes role-playing, lectures, class discussions, audio/video tapes, and individual projects.

SPAN 508: Spanish Translation and Interpretation for Health Care Professionals

3.00 Credits

This course will present standard Spanish terminology and dialectal variants (Central American, Mexican, Puerto Rican, etc.) for pediatrics, geriatrics, pulmonology, neurology, obstetrics and gynecology and internal medicine. This course examines patient-provider communication, cultural considerations in cross-cultural communication, interpreter code of ethics, and the role of the interpreter as facilitator. Designed for health care practioners, nursing students and students preparing to apply to medical school. Prerequisites: SP 207 or SP 320/321 or consent of instructor.

SPAN 510: Intensive Spanish Language and Culture for Priests and Seminarians

6.00 Credits

This course is designed to assist in the formation of priests and seminarians to work with the Hispanic community in the United States. It includes intensive Spanish language instruction (reading, writing, speaking and listening) and Hispanic culture. Taught abroad during summer. No previous knowledge of Spanish is required. May be repeated for credit.

SPAN 520: Transamerican Translations

3.00 Credits

This course is designed to introduce students to literary dialogues established through translation, particularly throughout the Americas. We will consider the works of Latin American and US writers, literary critics and translators as we pay close attention to the ethical, political and aesthetic debates surrounding translation throughout the Americas. The course content includes poetry, prose, novels and essays. Prerequisites: graduate standing or permission for advanced undergraduates.

SPAN 522: Prose of the Golden Age

3.00 Credits

A study of the main novelistic currents of the Renaissance; the sentimental novel (La carcel de amor), celestinesque literature (La Celestina), the picaresque novel (Lazarillo), and the didactic prose of Gracian.

SPAN 523: Golden Age Poetry

3.00 Credits

An analysis of the major schools of lyric poetry in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries in Spain with a reading of Garcilaso, Fray Luis de Leon, Herrera, and Gongora. Departmental permission required. Departmental permission required.

SPAN 524: Pastoral Novel

3.00 Credits

A study of the pastoral genre from classical antiquity to the sixteenth century with particular focus on Montemayor, Diana, and Cervantes, Galatea.

SPAN 525: Survey of Golden Age Drama

3.00 Credits

A study of the drama of the Spanish Golden Age from comedias to entremeses and autos sacramentales. The controversies of the Spanish theatre and its influence abroad are examined. Authors studied will include Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina, Cervantes, Alarcon, and Calderon.

SPAN 534: Prose of the Spanish Mystics

3.00 Credits

Concentrates on the works of Santa Teresa de Avila and San Juan de la Cruz; devoted to the study of asceticism and the Christian implications of mysticism.

SPAN 535: Religion in Modern and Contemporary Spanish Fiction

3.00 Credits

The course explores the most salient features of narrative fiction from the arrival of modernity in Spain to the present. The materials and discussions in this course are intended to provide general background knowledge on the cultural debates that took place in Spain around the dichotomy tradition vs. modernity, and also a more specific insight on the question of how religion participates and shapes those polemics through cultural production. This seminar delves into the importance of concepts such as the sacred and the secular, alternative forms of religion and belief, and national identities and spirituality.

SPAN 536: War on Modernity, Modernities at War: Culture and The Spanish Civil War

3.00 Credits

War on Modernity, Modernities at War: Culture and The Spanish Civil War explores cultural representations of the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) and its aftermath from the viewpoint of conflicting ideas of modernity that coexisted in 20th century Europe and took a very specific form in Spain: a Republican cause that defended the values of social diversity and democratic pluralism; a Nationalist cause that based modernity on a centralized apparatus controlling political dissent and social mobility. The course focuses on the analysis of the contradictions inherent in a plural society that was forced to imagine (and demise) a monolithic "other" and take arms against them. Special attention will be paid towards the distinction between the cultural productions that emerged during the war, under Franco, and from exile, as well as issues related to memory, commemoration, and reconciliation throughout the analysis of literary and cinematic texts dating from the 1930s to the present day. Texts by Helen Graham, Santos Julia, Paul Preston, Camilo Jose Cela, Miguel Delibes, Manuel Rivas, Ignacio Martinez de Pison. Movies by Ivens, Saura, Almodovar De la Iglesia, and Ziff.

SPAN 537: Dictatorship in Chile and Argentina

3.00 Credits

What forces brought about and justified the most recent dictatorships in Chile and Argentina? How did journalists, historians, economists, and artists respond to censorship, torture and he disappearance of thousands of individuals? In this interdisciplinary course, we will read historical, literary and theoretical texts, as well as view films and documentaries that address the Chilean and Argentinean dictatorships of the 1970s and 1980s. We will compare the construction of arguments, the use of evidence, and aesthetic techniques developed across these genres with the purpose of understanding distinct approaches to history. Finally, we will become conversant with secondary sources that focus on testimony, memory, trauma and the use of torture.

SPAN 538: Representations of the Urban Space in 20th-21st-century Spanish Culture

3.00 Credits

This course explores cultural productions 20th and 21st-century Spain from the perspective of urban studies. Through a series of primary and secondary readings as well as visual works, the course studies how Spanish cities have been transformed since the arrival of modernization and industrialization up to the present day, and how cultural productions have represented these transformations. The course will pay particular attention at how successive historical, political, and intellectual periods in Spain have fostered discussions about modern narratives of progress, secularization, and cosmopolitanism using the city and the urban experience as pivotal concepts. Readings and discussions will also look at the creation of a dynamics of opposition, reproduction, and interdependence between the city and supposedly antagonistic spatial categories (rural, country, nature).

SPAN 540: Literature of Post-Civil War Spain

3.00 Credits

In this course we will discuss the reaction to the Spanish Civil War as seen in the poetry, short story, theater and novel of the 1940s through 1960s principally. The shadow of violence affected many of Spain's authors whose artistic and intellectual formation occurred during or immeditaly after the Civil War. We will study the poetry of the 'social poets' of the 1940s, such as Blas de Oero and Gabriel Celaya; some veterans of the Genration of 1927 who continued writing; Miguel de Henadez, who die din prison in 1942, and others. Amont the authors of prose or theater to be read are Camilo José Cela, Mercé Rodoreda, Carmen Laforet, Juan Goytisolo, Ana María Matute, Luis Martín Santos, Carmen Martín Gaite, José Ruibal, Miguel Delibes, Alfonso Sastre, and others. We will also consider literary movmets of the 1940s through 1960s in Europe and elswehere which may have affected these writers.

SPAN 541: The 18th Century and Romanticism in Spain

3.00 Credits

A survey of late eighteenth-century literature and romanticism. Drama, poetry, prose. Moratin, Cadalso, Feijoo, Rivas, Zorrilla, Larra, Espronceda, Becquer.

SPAN 542: Realism in Spain

3.00 Credits

A study of the literary phenomenon of realism within the specific historical, political, and cultural context of modern Spain. After a preliminary study of the journalistic and literary prose of the Romantic period and costumbrismo, the course's emphasis will be placed on the main novelistic currents from mid-nineteenth century to the turn of the century, with special attention to the novels of Perez-Galdós, Valera, Pardo Bazán, and "Clarín."

SPAN 543: Generation of 1898 & Modernism

3.00 Credits

Concentrates on the works of Unamuno, Baroja, Machado, Azorin, and Valle-Inclan. Includes works by Dario and other modernistas of Latin America as well as Spain.

SPAN 544: Generation of 1927- Vanguardism

3.00 Credits

Emphasis on the Generation of 1927 and Vanguardismo in Spain, including such writers as Garcia Lorca, Salinas, Guillen, Alberti, and others.

SPAN 545: Modern Spanish Short Story and Novella

3.00 Credits

Studies the short story and novella of nineteenth and twentieth-century Spain. Discussion of the poetics of shorter fiction as opposed to the longer novel, using current theory. Among authors whose short fiction will be studied: Galdos, Clarin, Pardo Bazan, Cela, Delibes, Martin Gaite, Matute, Marse, and others.

SPAN 546: Spanish Literature of the Turn of the Century (1880-1920)

3.00 Credits

Will explore the literature of Spain at the end of the nineteenth century and the beginning of the twentieth, focusing on transitional literature (theatre, novel, poetry, and essays) representing the Generation of 1898, Modernism, and the so-called Generation of 1912. Particular attention to the philosophical and aesthetic movements important in Europe as they affected Spain: Decadentism, Symbolism, etc. Among writers studied: Clarin, Unamuno, Valle-Inclan, Pardo Bazan, Machado, Ortega, and others.

SPAN 547: Melodrama! or the Mode of Excess in the Span-Speaking World

3.00 Credits

Melodrama is commonly criticized as a clichéd, excessive form of storytelling, ripe with virtuous victims and leering villains. But what if it is much more, as recent scholarship suggests? This seminar develops a historical and theoretical framework for studying melodrama as a pervasive narrative mode in Latin America. We will start from its origins in nineteenth century literary traditions and trace its conventions to the present, as they vary in different national cultures and media across the Spanish-speaking world. Our focus will be on developing a set of theoretical principles that we can then test historically and in diverse cultural contexts. We will ask ourselves, among other questions: in what ways does melodrama appear in literature, periodicals, and films? What aesthetic and cultural roles does it play? What are its formulae? Is melodrama indeed 'excessive,' in opposition to what 'norm'? What melodramatic themes cross national borders, time, media? What relations can we establish between melodrama and multiple socio-historical contexts? Does melodrama offer political stances vis-à-vis social realities? To answer these questions, we will look at melodramatic texts, films, and Latin American and Euro-American theories of melodrama. Even though this course takes as starting point the textual/filmic production of diverse nations in Latin America, we will challenge the very categories of national literatures and film cultures by exploring the ways in which melodrama is produced and consumed throughout the region.

SPAN 550: Mexican Civilization

3.00 Credits

Study of Mexican indigenous cultures and their influence in the development of Mexican national identity by studying a wide variety of cultural forms (literature, visual arts, music, drama, and film) from Pre-Hispanic times to modern-day Mexico. Prerequisite: Instructor's consent.

SPAN 556: Latin American Popular Song: Socio-Political Movements

3.00 Credits

An interdisciplinary study of selected twentieth-century Latin American popular song repertoires and their relationship to socio-political movements. It examines songs from the New Song (Argentina and Chile), the New Trova (Cuba and Nicaragua), and Mexican corridos, among others, and artists such as Atahualpa Yupanqui, Víctor Jara, Violeta Parra, Pablo Milanés, Silvio Rodríguez, Carlos Mejía Godoy, Chalino Sánchez, and Lila Downs.

SPAN 559: Colonial Women: From Early Modern to Postmodern Icons

3.00 Credits

Study of female figures (such as the Virgin of Guadalupe, La Malinche, Catalina de Erauso, and Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz) that became cultural icons in Latin American colonial societies. This course focuses on their writings, writings and films about them, from the early modern to the postmodern periods. Readings include, Nican Mopohua, Sor Juana's Respuesta, Erauso's La monja alférez, Rosario Castellanos's El eterno femenino, Laura Esquivel's Malinche, Humberto Hermosillo's Esmeralda viene de noche, Octavio Paz's Los hijos de la Malinche, and others.

SPAN 561: Aesthetics of the Encounter: Exploration and Conquest of Latin America

3.00 Credits

The arrival of Christopher Columbus in 1492 to the Americas marked the beginning of the age of exploration and conquest of the continent. We will examine the cultural encounters between the ancient Latin American civilizations and the Europeans. This course will focus on the cultural artifacts'poetry, songs, pictorial representations, and chronicles'that both Spaniards and indigenous people of the Americas produced to record these events. Conflicting views and diverse artistic expressions blend to represent the cultural tension inherent in what we will call the aesthetics of the encounter.

SPAN 564: Latin American Modernity

3.00 Credits

no description available

SPAN 565: National and Post-National Narratives in Spanish American Fiction

3.00 Credits

This course examines the twentieth-century Spanish American novel with a focus on the relationship between fiction and the discourse of national identity in the region. Using primary as well as secondary sources, the course explores in historical, cultural, political and aesthetic contexts the so-called Latin American literary Boom and Post-Boom eras, as well as the main features of genres such as the novela de la revolucion, the novela de la tierrra, the novela de la dictadura and the novela testimonial. Authors include: Romulo Gallegos, Helena Garro, Juan Rulfo, Jose Maria Arguedas, Carlos Fuentes, Gabriel Garcia Marques, Elena Poniatowska, Luis Rafael Sanchez, Antonio Skarmeta, Fernando Vallejo and Roberto Bolano. Taught in Spanish.

SPAN 569: Spanish American Modernismo and its Legacy

3.00 Credits

This seminar is an introduction to Spanish America's first autonomous cultural and literary movement. Through readings of modernista poetry, chronicles, short stories and novels, the course explores some of the central issues surrounding cultural production in Spanish America at the end of the nineteenth and the turn of the twentieth-centuries. We will discuss texts by authors such as Delmira Agustini, Rubén Darío, Julián del Casal, Manuel Díaz Rodríguez, Manuel Gutiérrez Nájera, Julio Herrera y Reissig, Leopoldo Lugones, José Martí, José Enrique Rodó and José Asunción Silva while focusing on topics including cultural independence, modernity, cosmopolitanism, the role of art and the artist in the capitalist world, religion, urbanization, individualism and self-representation. The seminar will also explore the legacy of modernismo in twentieth-century Latin American culture, focusing on its impact in musical genres such as bolero and its imprint in novels by Alejo Carpentier, Luis Rafael Sánchez and Germán Espinosa. In Spanish. Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

SPAN 570: Mexican Literature and Film

3.00 Credits

A study of Mexican culture through the analysis of narrative, drama, essay, poetry, and film. Topics will vary and may include: the conquest, indigenismo, gender issues, the Mexican revolution, among others. Prerequisite: Instructor's consent.

SPAN 573: Central American Testimonial Tradition

3.00 Credits

Interdisciplinary study of testimonial expressions in Central America during the political struggles of the late 20th century, with particular emphasis in Guatemala, El Salvador, and Nicaragua. The course will examine a variety of cultural texts: literature (by Rigoberta Menchú, Miguel Mármol, Manlio Argueta, Ernesto Cardenal, Gioconda Belli, among others), music, visual arts, and films. Undergraduate students need instructor's authorization.

SPAN 576: Intellectual Debates in Latin America

3.00 Credits

This seminar will explore debates over the idea of Latin America and its cultural and political identity in the 19th and 20th centuries through and in depth study of the essay genre and selected novels and films. Building from foundational texts by Sarmiento, Marti and Rodó, the course will follow cultural debates such as indigenismo, mestizaje and transculturacion, cannibalism as a cultural metaphor, cultural hybridity, modernity and post-modernity. Authors include Vasconcelos, Mariategui, de Andrade, Freyre, Ortíz, Rama, Retamar, Galeano, Cornejo Polar and Garcia Canclini. The course will be conducted in Spanish. A Spanish version of texts in Portuguese will be provided.

SPAN 577: Cultural Competence Awareness in Health Care

3.00 Credits

This course is an on-line asynchronous course combined along with scheduled discussions with the professor and threaded discussions with peers. The objective of this on-line course is to develop cultural awareness and sensitivity skills along with Medical Spanish language acquisition that will help students provide competent and excellent healthcare to Hispanic populations. This course is taught in English and there will be nuances of Spanish to better explain the cultural material.

SPAN 577N: Cultural Competence Awareness in Health Care

0 Credits

This course is a weekly on-line asynchronous course where students can access course materials at any time along with scheduled discussions with the professor and threaded discussions with peers. The objective of this on-line course is to develop cultural awareness and sensitivity skills along with Medical Spanish language acquisition that will help students provide competent and excellent healthcare to Hispanic populations. This course is taught in English and there will be nuances of Spanish to better explain the cultural material. This course bills at a special rate. Contact the Department of Modern Languages for information.

SPAN 577T: Cultural Competence Awareness in Health Care

3.00 Credits

This course bills at a special rate. Contact the Department of Modern Languages for information.

SPAN 578: Fictions of Truth and Memory: Fiction, Performance, and Parody in 21st-Century Latin America

3.00 Credits

no description available

SPAN 592: Directed Reading - Masters

3.00 Credits

no description available

SPAN 594: Independent Study - Masters

3.00 Credits

no description available

SPAN 631: Cervantes & The Quijote

3.00 Credits

A close reading of Cervantes' masterpiece and the projection of the work within the epic tradition and chivalric literature.

SPAN 641: 19th Century Spanish Narrative

3.00 Credits

Fortunata y Jacinta and La Regenta - Focuses on two masterpieces of nineteenth-century Spanish narrative, Galdos' Fortunata y Jacinta and Clarin's La Regenta. Special attention given to narrative theory.

SPAN 642: Modern Spanish Narrative

3.00 Credits

A study of Spanish narrative since the Civil War. Special attention to Cela, Goytisolo, Martin Santos, Delibes, Martin Gaite, and others.

SPAN 650: Sor Juana Ines De La Cruz and Her Baroque World

3.00 Credits

Study of major works of Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz and her cultural milieu. Works include a broad selection of her prose, drama, and poetry. The course will also cover modern representations of Sor Juana.

SPAN 652: 19th Century Spanish-American Novel

3.00 Credits

Development of the nineteenth-century Spanish American novel through close reading of the most important works of Romanticism, Modernism, and Naturalism. Core of the course will be the following novels: Cecilia Valdes, Maria, Amalia, La Gloria de don Ramiro, Martin Rivas, Sin rumbo, Dona Barbara.

SPAN 653: 20th Century Spanish American Novel

3.00 Credits

Special emphasis on Carpentier, Rulfo, Donoso, Garcia-Marquez, Fuentes, Vargas Llosa, and some younger novelists.

SPAN 656: Early Modern Female Conventual Culture

3.00 Credits

Interdisciplinary and Transatlantic study of early modern female conventual culture in the Hispanic world. This course examines the cultural production of convents (poetry, drama, autobiographies, spiritual writings, visual arts, and music) in its historical and religious contexts. Readings will include texts by Spanish nuns St. Teresa of Avila, María de Ágreda, María de San Alberto, and María de San José Salazar, and Spanish American nuns Inés de la Cruz, Úrsula Suárez, María de San José, and Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, among others. Course will be taught in English.

SPAN 657: The New Latin American Historical Novel

3.00 Credits

The revisitation of Latin American history has become a concern of many Latin American writers. However, their way of fictionalizing history is different from the traditional historical novel in which authors did not deviate from the official or even alternative accounts of history. Characters and historical events are recast in a manner that distorts history by using disturbing and unexpected omissions, deletions and anachronisms, and obliterates the borders between facts and fiction. They are essentially parodic discourses intending to subvert hegemonic versions of history, and recreate playfully as well as seriously important historical figures, such as Christopher Columbus, Alvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, Simón Bolívar, and Fray Cervando de Mier. Some of the novels that will be included in this course are El general en su laberinto by Gabriel García Márquez, Los perros del paraíso by Abel Posse, La campaña by Carlos Fuentes, and La fiesta del Chivo by Mario Vargas Llosa.

SPAN 658: The Mexican Conquest: European and Indigenous Accounts

3.00 Credits

In-depth study of the Mexican Conquest from both European and Indigenous accounts. This course will examine the narrative discourse of primary texts, the contradictions within and among the diverse texts, the myths surrounding the Latin American conquest in general and Mexican in particular, and historiographical issues about the documents under study. Main authors/texts will include Hernan Cortes, Francisco López de Gómara, Bernal Díaz del Castillo, Bartolomé de Las Casas, Alva Ixtlilxóchitl, Bernadino de Sahagún, Fray Toribio de Motolinía, Diego Muñoz Camargo, Diego Durán, Hernando Alvarado Tezozomoc, Florentine Codex, Cantares mexicanos, and the Lienzo of Tlaxcala.

SPAN 696: Master's Thesis Research

0 Credits

This course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.

SPAN 698A: Master's Comprehensive Examination (w/Classes)

0 Credits

no description available

SPAN 698B: Master's Comprehensive Examination (w/o Classes)

0 Credits

Enrollment in this course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.

SPAN 703: Spanish Proseminar

3.00 Credits

Introduction to the current state of literary theory and criticism, linguistics, philology, methods of research, and bibliography. Required for all graduate students. Offered every other year.

SPAN 792: Directed Reading - Doctoral

3.00 Credits

no description available

SPAN 794: Independent Study - Doctoral

1.00 Credits

no description available

SPAN 996: Doctoral Dissertation Research

0 Credits

This course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.

SPAN 998A: Doctoral Comprehensive Examination (w/Classes)

0 Credits

no description available

SPAN 998B: Doctoral Comprehensive Examination (w/o Classes)

0 Credits

Enrollment in this course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.