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Course Descriptions

German (GER)

To view the complete schedule of courses for
each semester, go to Cardinal Station.

GER 101: Elementary German I

4.00 Credits

German 101, a first semester German course, introduces students to the language and culture of the modern German-speaking world. This course stresses self-expression in everyday situations for basic survival needs in German-speaking language communities and for personal enjoyment. Students use fundamental vocabulary and grammar structures to talk about daily life and gain insights into aspects of German culture through simple reading and listening activities. Class meets four days per week. In this course students work to develop all four language-skills - speaking, reading, listening, and writing. Undergraduate Language courses 101-113 are subject to an Instructional Fee at the time of registration. For current Tuition and Fees visit http://enrollmentservices.cua.edu/Student-Financial-Information/Costs.cfm.

GER 101M: Elementary German I

4.00 Credits

Designed for students with little or no prior experience with German. Introduction to the basic principles of language necessary for written and oral communication. Students use fundamental vocabulary and grammar structures to talk about daily life and gain insights into aspects of German culture through simple readings and Internet activities. Students who took the language in high school for more than one year MUST take the language placement test before registering for this or any other language course in order to receive proper credit. This section is open to Music students only. Non Music students need special permission to enroll. Undergraduate Language courses 101-113 are subject to an Instructional Fee at the time of registration. For current Tuition and Fees visit http://enrollmentservices.cua.edu/Student-Financial-Information/Costs.cfm.

GER 102: Elementary German II

4.00 Credits

German 102 builds on what students have learned during their first semester of German to further expand oral communication, writing, reading, and listening skills. The course introduces additional grammar and vocabulary and it continues to prepare students to deal with basic communicative tasks in German. Students will read and discuss texts from a variety of text types to learn more about various aspects of the culture and civilization found in the German-speaking countries, including issues of everyday life and current social, cultural, and political topics. Prerequisite: C- or better in Ger 101, Level 2 placement, or equivalent. Undergraduate Language courses 101-113 are subject to an Instructional Fee at the time of registration. For current Tuition and Fees visit http://enrollmentservices.cua.edu/Student-Financial-Information/Costs.cfm.

GER 102M: Elementary German II

4.00 Credits

no description available

GER 103: Intermediate German I

3.00 Credits

Introduces additional grammar and vocabulary; builds speaking and reading skills; prepares students to deal with basic communicative tasks in German. Features contemporary texts on various aspects of the culture and civilization found in German-speaking countries. Prerequisite: C- or better in German 102, Level 3 placement or equivalent. Undergraduate Language courses 101-113 are subject to an Instructional Fee at the time of registration. For current Tuition and Fees visit http://enrollmentservices.cua.edu/Student-Financial-Information/Costs.cfm.

GER 104: Intermediate German II

3.00 Credits

German 104 builds on what students have learned during their first three semesters of German to further expand oral communication, writing, reading, and listening skills. The course introduces additional grammar and vocabulary and it continues to prepare students to deal with basic communicative tasks in German. The course content is based on topics linked to a novel and a film. Students will read contemporary texts from a variety of text types to learn more about different aspects of German culture and civilization, as well as geography, language, customs, history, culture, identity, and issues of everyday life. Prerequisite: C- or better in Ger 103, Level 4 placement or equivalent. Undergraduate Language courses 101-113 are subject to an Instructional Fee at the time of registration. For current Tuition and Fees visit http://enrollmentservices.cua.edu/Student-Financial-Information/Costs.cfm.

GER 130: Berlin: A Walk through History

1.00 Credits

This course is taught in Berlin during Spring Break. The course investigates Berlin's history and culture, old and new, through the prism of the city's urban landscape. The students will explore Berlin's most important sites as they learn about the legacies of Germany's troubled past during World War II and the Cold War. The course will also focus students' attention on the newly reunited Berlin as a center of German and European politics.

GER 203: Advanced German I: German through Film

3.00 Credits

First semester develops functional language skills with special emphasis on speaking and listening. Instructional units address recent developments in contemporary German society and culture. Materials from authentic media such as video, magazine articles, and short literary texts. Prerequisite: German 104.

GER 204: Advanced German II: German through Literature

3.00 Credits

This course further develops functional language skills with special emphasis on reading and writing. Students read examples from a variety of text types and write on various topics in different media (blogs, Wikis, encyclopedia entries, reviews, etc.). The course also serves as an introduction to German literature, genre, and literary analysis. Prerequisite: Ger 104 or equivalent.

GER 210: France and Germany and the Construction of the European Community

3.00 Credits

The course is about the crucial role of France and Germany at the end of WWII, leading to the development of the European Community. Students will study the international context at the time of the cold war from and within which the European Union was born. They will explore how after three wars in less than a century, the french-German cooperation in culture, economy, politics, has manages to secure peace and harmony in a continent previously shattered by conflicts. Taught in English. Based on lectures, class discussions and video material.

GER 220: Vienna in Literature and the Arts

3.00 Credits

This course, taught in English, explores the city of Vienna, home of Mozart, Beethoven, Haydn, Strauss, Mahler, Schönberg, Wittgenstein, Freud, Klimt, Kokoschka, Schiele, the Habsburgs, Kaffeehaus culture, Sachertorte, Jugendstil (Art Nouveau), and The Third Man, through literature, film, architecture, art, and music.

GER 225: Magic in German and Hispanic Literature and Film

3.00 Credits

This course explores 'Magical Realism', the merging of reality with magical elements, as it evolved in the art and literature in German and Spanish speaking countries. Through a variety of texts, students will develop an understanding of the concept and its different representations. Critical questions of translation, regionalism, and cultural identity will be discussed. Readings include works by such acclaimed authors as Gabriel García Márquez, Günter Grass, Mario Vargas Llosa, Ernst Jünger, Jorge Luis Borges, Alejo Carpentier, Marie Luise Kaschnitz, Laura Esquivel, and Patrick Süskind Films include Un chien andalou (Luis Buñuel; Salvador Dalí, 1929), Aguirre. Der Zorn Gottes (Werner Herzog, 1972), Como agua para chocolate (Alfonso Arau, 1992). In English. Fulfills the humanities and literature requirement.

GER 230: Grimms' Fairy Tales

3.00 Credits

The course, which is taught in English, engages with Grimms' fairy tales in the Western intellectual tradition by analyzing literary fairy tales from continental Europe written between 1600 and 1900. Students explore fairy tales as a genre and its links to socioeconomic class, family conflicts, gender, politics, economics, society, and cultural life. The tales will be read using literary theory as well as cultural and media studies. All readings and class discussion are taught in English. No prerequisites.

GER 242: Das Nibelungenlied: Myth and Ideology

3.00 Credits

The course traces the reception of the medieval Nibelungen story from its beginnings to the present day with special emphasis on its most influential adaptations, its appropriation as German national epic, and the peculiar role it played and continues to play in shaping a German cultural and national identity. A variety of media will be studied, including literary texts, opera, theater, film, art, architecture, historical sources, political speeches, pamphlets, advertisement, newspaper articles, and scholarly essays. All readings will be in English translation. The course fulfills the humanities requirement.

GER 250: Berlin in Literature and Film

3.00 Credits

For the last 150 years, the city of Berlin has been the political and cultural center of Germany and Europe. The course explores the turbulent history of the city through its architecture, literature, films, and the creative arts. Discussions will focus on Berlin as the capital city (Prussian monarchy, Weimar Republic, Third Reich, and contemporary Germany); the divided and reunited city; Berlin as a meeting point for diverse religions, ethnicities, and ideologies; and the city's multicultural history. An optional one-week trip to Berlin during spring break 2018 will be available for interested students. The course will be taught in English; counts as a literature, humanities, and European Studies elective.

GER 260: 100 Years of German Film

3.00 Credits

This course discusses a selection of German movies from the early 20th century to present day in the context of their historical significance. We will explore their cultural impact as well as familiarize ourselves with the terminology of cinema as well as movements and eras such as Expressionism, New Objectivity, Fascist propaganda, Post WWII-cinema, the New German Cinema and Post-Reunification Cinema. The course will be taught in English. No prerequisites. Counts for Humanites credit.

GER 270: Exile, Trauma, and Displacement in German Literature

3.00 Credits

This course explores notions of exile, refugee status, and the crossing of political and cultural boundaries to and from the German-speaking countries in the 20th and 21st centuries. Course readings focus on personal narratives and literary works that were written at a time and place when Germany, Austria, and Switzerland both displaced and welcomed those seeking to escape persecution and violence. The course will explore migration in a historical, cultural, and literary perspective. Taught in English. Satisfies requirements for humanities and literature.

GER 300: Thinking Critically: Literature, Film, and Media in the German-Speaking World

3.00 Credits

German 300 focuses on the acquisition of analytical skills through close reading and textual analysis. Here 'text' is used in its broadest sense; students will become familiar with and able to analyze a host of literary genres and types of texts, from novels and plays to political tracts, propaganda, paintings, and film. In addition to honing students' analytical skills, this course is designed to introduce students to some of the key texts in German-language literature and culture. This course is required for majors and recommended for any student who will enroll in 300-level and higher courses in German.

GER 301: Society and Culture in the German-Speaking World

3.00 Credits

This course provides students with the necessary historical background and social and cultural context to analyze contemporary issues in the German-speaking world. Students will study the appropriate historical and contextual framework in order to critically analyze contemporary issues. By completing a series of modules students will become familiar with both the key historical events and the contemporary debates in the German-speaking world. Required for majors and recommended for any students who will enroll in 300-level and higher courses. Fulfills humanities and literature requirement. Prerequisite: 203 or 204.

GER 320: Contemporary German Literature by Migrant Authors

3.00 Credits

This course studies the literature of immigrants to Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. Students learn about migration and cultural politics. They discuss questions central to the current public discourse in the emerging multicultural societies. Students read literature by German-speaking migrant authors to study questions of cultural identity, the construction of 'home' and 'homeland' (Heimat) as well as issues of memory, gender, and religion. All readings and discussions are in German.

GER 330: German Theater: Text and Performance

3.00 Credits

This course introduces students to central theories of drama that have influenced German playwrights from the 18th century to the present. After close reading of plays by major German authors, students will discuss a number of short plays by 20th century dramatists and select one for performance. Assignments include analytical papers, presentations, a play bill, and the staging of a play. All readings and discussions will be in German.

GER 360: Writing Since the 1990's

3.00 Credits

Literature and Debate in Reunited Germany --- This course will examine the reflection of social and political debate in prose fiction of the past decade. Readings illustrate a wide range of issues: problems of reunification, German identity in a multicultural Europe, memories of the Holocaust, and nostalgia for the former German Democratic Republic. All featured texts are representations of social and moral concerns facing Germans today.

GER 401: German for Business

3.00 Credits

In this course students take a hands-on approach to use German in a professional setting. Students acquire appropriate vocabulary for presentations, meetings, and written correspondence. Subjects range from company profiles, understanding German business customs, creating a German resume and making contacts, and learning about European Union industrial practices. This course aims to develop skills for the job market.

GER 402: Translation in Theory and Practice

3.00 Credits

The course provides an introduction to translation theory, but the majority of class time will be devoted to translations to and from German. Students will translate literary and non-literary texts, short film clips, advertisements and radio excerpts. Through intensive translation practice students increase their linguistic competence and they practice rhetorical, stylistic, semantic and syntactic structures of German. Prerequisite: German 204 or instructor's permission.

GER 488: Special Topics Seminar

3.00 Credits

This seminar is an intensive research seminar that focuses on a topic related to German literature[s] and culture[s]. The seminar will help students develop strong research skills (identifying a problem, defining a thesis, establishing a coherent methodological approach, selecting relevant primary and secondary sources, mastering MLA style). Students will also practice to prepare and deliver scholarly oral presentation and prepare a 10-pages seminar paper. The specific course content varies. Required for all graduating seniors. Prerequisite: Graduating senior or instructor's permission. May be repeated with different content for credit.

GER 489: Senior Research Seminar

3.00 Credits

Students will write a senior thesis in German, at least 20 pages in length, excluding title page and bibliography. This seminar will continue to strengthen student's research skills learned in GER 488, and further develop argumentation strategies, use of textual support, application of critical and theoretical literature, editing techniques, and oral presentation style. After completing the senior comprehensive examinations, students will continue to refine their thesis and prepare for a formal public oral presentation in German of their research project at the end of the semester. The evaluation will be based on classwork, weekly assignments, the final version of the senior thesis, and the formal oral presentation. Required for senior concentrators in German. Open to senior concentrators only.

GER 494: Independent Study

3.00 Credits

no description available

GER 495: German Internship

3.00 Credits

GER 495 is a for-credit internship open to German studies majors. The course is designed to allow students to apply their knowledge of the German language and their cultural knowledge in the workplace while further developing their competence. German for Business is strongly recommended. Students must get approval from the German academic advisor in the semester prior to taking the course in order to begin plans for the internship. A minimum of 100 hours in the internship are required plus weekly meetings with the internship coordinator.

GER 498: Undergraduate Comprehensive Examination

0 Credits

no description available

GER 500: Reading for Comprehension

0 Credits

The fundamentals of German grammar and rapid reading and analysis of German texts. Passing this course fulfills the graduate language requirement. Additional preparation may be needed for advanced requirements in some schools and programs. Cost equivalent to that of a three-credit course.

GER 594: Independent Study

3.00 Credits

no description available