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Course Descriptions

Arabic (ARAB)

To view the complete schedule of courses for
each semester, go to Cardinal Station.

ARAB 101: Introduction to Modern Standard Arabic

4.00 Credits

This introduction course to Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) uses video-based course materials and focuses on developing proficiency in the standard written Arabic language, as well as formal spoken Arabic understood by educated speakers across the Arab world. The course begins with learning the script and the sound system using Alf-Baa as a core text. The book simultaneously introduces vocabulary so that students can begin performing dialogues and other activities from the first week. After the alphabet is covered, students complete the first chapters of Al-Kitaab Part 1 in which more grammar and vocabulary are introduced at a faster rate to build the foundation for general communicative competence and greater cultural awareness. The course will meet five days a week.

ARAB 102: Elementary Modern Standard Arabic II

4.00 Credits

The second semester of the first-year Modern Standard Arabic requires successful completion of ARAB 101, or the equivalent exposure to Modern Standard Arabic. The course continues to use videos and texts centered around topics in Al-Kitaab Part 1. Students strive to develop a stronger foundation in all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The class will also include some exposure to the Damascene/Levantine colloquial to better understand how Arabic is used in daily life. In addition to traditional textbook exercises in Al-Kitaab Part 1, students will perform skits, write short essays and letters, participate in role plays, and undertake other interactive activities throughout the semester. The course will meet five days a week.

ARAB 103: Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic I

4.00 Credits

Second-year Arabic is open to students who have successfully completed one full year (two semesters of Elementary Arabic) or who have had an equivalent exposure to Modern Standard Arabic. Students will acquire more vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions, as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a wider range of texts in Arabic, including course schedules and travel itineraries. In addition to completing Al-Kitaab Part 1 and traditional textbook exercises, students will write short essays, deliver presentations, and participate in role plays, dialogues, and other interactive activities throughout the semester. Through songs, videos, and films, students will become more familiar with the Damascene/Levantine colloquial, enhancing their ability to communicate with educated native speakers. ARAB 103/104 requires participation in three cultural activities per semester. The course will meet four days a week.

ARAB 104: Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic II

4.00 Credits

The second semester of the second-year Modern Standard Arabic course is open to students who have successfully completed ARAB 103 (three semesters of Arabic or the equivalent exposure). Students will begin Al-Kitaab Part 2 to continue acquiring vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions. They will also learn more skills enabling them to read and analyze a wider range of texts, including news articles and longer narrations in the past, present and future tenses. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises in Al-Kitaab Part 2, students will write short essays, deliver presentations, and participate in role plays, dialogues, and other interactive activities throughout the semester. Through more songs, videos, and films, students will become more familiar with the Damascene/Levantine colloquial, enhancing their ability to communicate with educated native speakers. ARAB 103/104 requires participation in three cultural activities per semester. The course will meet four days a week.

ARAB 111: Modern Standard Arabic Literacy at CUA

3.00 Credits

no description available

ARAB 130: Intro to Arabic Language and Culture

3.00 Credits

In this course, you will begin to build a foundation in Arabic language and explore many societies in the Middle East. Materials will highlight different voices of the contemporary Arab world. The course also offers ample opportunity to visually and interactively consider different aspects of Arab culture, which is in a constant state of change and fluctuation. Throughout the course, we will complicate the notion that a singular, monolithic Arab culture exists, while also searching for those elements that unify the vast Middle Eastern region. Through exposure to themes such geography, food, the arts (including music and the visual arts), diversity (Islam and other religions, ethnic groups, and more), economics, conflict, and other elements of everyday life, you will feel yourself experiencing today's world in different Arab countries. You will also consider the various ways in which Arabs themselves perceive, appreciate, and critique their own societies. The course ultimately helps participants develop a greater awareness and understanding of attitudes and values that may differ from their own environment and background. As noted on the official flyer, you can expect to learn the following from this course: how to read and write the entire Arabic alphabet, basic conversational skills in Arabic, a broad historical overview of the Arab world through the present day, cultural phenomena through thematic modules, and more about the topics that interest you with interactive exercises and assignments. PLEASE NOTE: For CUA undergraduate students, this course can fulfill a humanities requirement or be counted as an elective. This course is asynchronous, meaning that there are no regular times that the course will meet in the seven weeks that it occurs (from May 9 - June 25, 2016). This means that the coursework can be completed at times that fit your personal schedule. For your benefit, certain assignments require virtual interaction with your peers and professor. Moreover, the professor will hold regular and optional 'office hours,' based on a time that is mutually convenient for all participants, should you need any assistance. This course is not only open to undergraduate and graduate students at any university, but also the general public. Please email guthriee@cua.edu with any questions. REQUIRED MATERIALS: You only need to purchase the third edition of the textbook 'Alif-Baa' with the DVD (Brustad et al, Georgetown University Press), which provides a comprehensive overview of the Arabic alphabet and intro to basic conversation. You will also need access to a webcam to be used a few times throughout the course.

ARAB 199: Language and Culture Immersion in Arabic

1.00 Credits

no description available

ARAB 201: Introduction to Arabic Culture

3.00 Credits

no description available

ARAB 203: Advanced Composition and Conversation I

3.00 Credits

Third-year Arabic is open to students who have successfully completed two full years of Arabic study (four semesters of Elementary Arabic and Intermediate Arabic) or who have had an equivalent exposure to Modern Standard Arabic. It concentrates on developing advanced proficiency in all four basic skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing, in addition to cultural competency. The course will also include more extensive exposure to dialectical variation in the Arabic language, while focusing particularly on the Levantine/Damascene dialect. Students will be challenged to acquire the vocabulary and grammatical structures necessary to conduct more complex interactions with native speakers. They also develop stronger reading skills to approach and analyze a wider range of texts, including political, social, and religious texts, as well as excerpts of literary works. Each chapter has a thematic focus, such as migration phenomena, popular holidays and celebrations, bargaining in the market place, and marriage practices. The course will meet two days a week.

ARAB 204: Advanced Composition and Conversation II

3.00 Credits

This course is open to those who have successfully completed more than two full years of Arabic study (the equivalent of ARAB 203). It concentrates on further developing and refining advanced Modern Standard Arabic proficiency in all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing, in addition to strengthening overall cultural competency. The course will also include some exposure to dialects, especially the Levantine dialect. Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for more complex interactions with native speakers, as well as skills that will allow them to approach and analyze a wider range of texts. We will concentrate on some familiar as well as new themes, including migration phenomena in the Middle East, travel and exploration (both contemporarily and in past Islamic civilizations), and gender issues. You will also learn how to make sense of authentic Arabic media articles discussing familiar topics. This course is excellent preparation for even higher level Arabic courses with a political or literary focus, such as ARAB 205 ('Media Arabic').

ARAB 205: Media Arabic

3.00 Credits

Do you want to learn how to comfortably discuss current events and comment on the news in Arabic? The course Media Arabic provides students with the vocabulary and discourse structures necessary to critically analyze and speak about topics in today's Arabic media coverage. In addition to completing exercises in an Arabic media textbook, students will listen to real news programs and radio broadcasts, explore blogs, and examine articles from Arabic magazines and newspapers. Al-Jazeera, Al-Arabiyya, BBC Arabic, Al-Ahram, Al-Quds, and Al-Arab are just a few of the sources from which authentic mass media materials will be analyzed and discussed. While the course will be taught in Modern Standard Arabic, Arabic dialects will also be incorporated into many of the multimedia exercises. This course will be co-taught with Nabiha Al-Khatib, CUA's Fulbright Language Teaching Assistant. It fulfills Islamic World Studies certificate and minor requirements.

ARAB 213: Development and Humanitarian Interventions in the Middle East, Africa, and Beyond

3.00 Credits

What actors are most pivotally shaping development in the Middle East, Africa, and beyond, and how have their missions evolved over time? In natural disasters and man-­made crises, how are humanitarian aid interventions from multilateral institutions, like UN agencies, comparing with NGOs and other groups. Through readings highlighting development projects and humanitarian crises in different regions of the world, this course will take a look at three main models of development. Among the topics of discussion, we will consider health care, gender equity, economic empowerment, and refugee movements. This course is taught in English only. It can count as an anthropology course (Anthro 213). It can also fulfill humanities. credits and Islamic World Studies credits.

ARAB 494: Independent Study

3.00 Credits

no description available